The Oldest Bird In The World Is Nearly 70 Years Old And Still Gives Birth Evenly

319

The longest living bird in the world is nearly 70 years old but is still alive and well.

Wisdom

 

According to Science Alert, Wisdom is the most popular Laysan seagull in the world. Wisdom was 68 years old, and it was terrific when he hatched a baby bird in his nesting area in the Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge.

Once a year (at least since 2006), Wisdom and his partner Akeakamai returned to the Pacific atoll near Hawaii to lay eggs and hatch a seagull. This case can be considered a miracle when the average life of the Laysan bird is only about 50 years.

So how do people judge the age of these albatross?

The albatross species on Midway Atoll is given a numbered bracelet in 1936. Since then, 250,000 seagulls have been marked, allowing researchers to track each individually.

Wisdom was marked in 1956 by Chandler Robbins. At that time, it was estimated to be about six years old. It means that at least it is now about 68 years old.

Nobody saw Wisdom until 2001/2002 when Robbins found it again and re-tagged it.

Since that time, Wisdom is a frequent visitor of Midway Atoll. The US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) explained in a blog post that it is uncommon for a seagull to return, lay and hatch eggs every year – but Wisdom does not follow the rules. This.

The article explains: “It comes back in October to meet your partner and will spend about seven months at Midway Atoll to hatch eggs and raise children. It lays an egg, and both parents take turns — incubation for more than two months.

After the young bird hatches, another five to six months will pass before it leaves the island to fly to the sea. This process takes up too much time and energy, most Laysan seagulls, don’t lay eggs every year. ”

The team estimates Wisdom was raised between 31 and 36 children with Akeakamai (partner of Wisdom) and it seems that he still doesn’t want to stop at the moment.

Bob Peyton, Midway Atoll Refuge USFWS Project Team Leader, said: “Because Laysan albatrosses do not lay eggs every-year and when they do, they only keep one animal at a time, so each bird is a close-up. Great contribution to the population “.

And in a world facing climate change and mass extinction – it’s excellent that Wisdom brings good news to the new year. Hopefully, it will continue to be healthy and contribute more to the bird population.

 

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here